VIDEO Introducing MH/OSTA

Three-part series on housing issues in Douglas County - a must read!!!

Article by April Ehrlich reprinted with permission from the Roseburg News-Review, Roseburg, Oregon.



The first in a three-part series on housing issues in Douglas County.


Harvey and Jean Kloos’ home is crumbling beneath their feet.
The couple invested in the manufactured home in a sprawling retirement community in Canyonville because it was nice, spacious — a stark contrast from what most people imagine when they hear the colloquial phrase “trailer park.” Knoll Terrace’s manicured lawns and tasteful landscaping, winding roads and pine-clad hillsides, and friendly potlucks and barbecues completed the Kloos’ vision of peaceful retirement.
Most importantly, it provided a chance at homeownership within the tight budget of their fixed income.
Now, the home is not looking so inexpensive. The evergreen hillsides that make Knoll Terrace so appealing are shifting, melting, causing small landslides and cracking the homes’ foundations.  Click on the link to see full article   http://www.nrtoday.com/news/local/douglas_county/melting-lands-cracking-manufactured-homes/article_29df9411-49ab-5007-bd31-4ab8a9be73a7.html

The second in a three-part series on housing issues in Douglas County.


Mobile home park closures reduce housing supply



Rickety plyboard patios, threadbare awnings, chain-link fences and metal signs surround the ramshackle trailers at Junction Mobile Park in Winston. Knock on a door and someone will yell out, but no one will answer.
Residents here have settled into their spaces over the years. They have built gardens and walls and fences bordering their small homes, protecting them from a world that has deemed them “a collection of old junkers,” as one man put it.
Resident Rosemary Mullins was not surprised when she heard the park would close in a few years to make way for a business complex. At 67 years old, she has gotten used to pulling her recreational vehicle around to any place where she can afford the rent. Things happen, things change.
“I got to move on with my life,” she said.   Click on the link to see full article 
The last in a three-part series on housing issues in Douglas County. -  

State encourages innovation in home ownership


In July, president-elect Donald Trump declared via Twitter that home ownership rates have been their lowest in 51 years. He wasn’t wrong.
At the time, the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis showed the U.S. home ownership rate had plunged to its lowest depths since 1965.
Since then, Trump has given housing issues scant attention, even if his signature red hats declaring “Make America Great Again” harken back to a time when a single wage job could buy a home.
Douglas County’s home ownership rate is lower than that of the state and the country, according to 2014 census data. It has a higher level of poverty — about 20 percent of Douglas County people are living below the poverty level, compared to 17 percent in the state.
It also has a significant senior population. Nearly a quarter of Douglas County residents are 65 years or older, compared to 16 percent in the state. Click on the link to see full article 


Happy Thanksgiving to All
from your
MH/OSTA Board Members! 

2016 Annual Meeting Blues in the Night

My mama done told me; When I was in pigtails
My mama done told me hon;       A landlord ll sweet talk ;  And promise you good things
But when the sweet talking’s  done;           
A landlord is twofaced sweet talking thing who’ll
Leave you to sing;            The blues in the night
See him making friction; Hear him talk eviction       whoo wee 
My mama done told me
Talk to you legislator;   be an agitatior         whoo wee
mama done told me                     Whoo wee        whoo wee
An enforcement pack will hold back                        The blues in the night

From Medford to Salem               from Portland to Grants Pass
In towns clear across the state;      We need to fight for enforcement
Of laws to protect us           Or it’ll be our fate
To live with the two faced worrisome thing who’ll leave us t sing
The blues in the night
Hum       Humm
My mama was right


There’s blues in the night.

2016 Annual Meeting O'Billy McGee McGaw

Two park owners sat in a tree – O’Billy McGee McGaw
Two park owners sat in a tree – The were greedy as they could be
And they all flapped their wings and cried, CAW CAW CAW.
We don’t give a hoot about the law.
Said one land lord, “ Let’s increase our cash” O’Billy McGee McGaw
Said one land lord, “ Let’s increase our cash and evict from our parks white trash
And they both flapped their wings and cried CAW CAW CAW 
We don’t have to obey the law
So they made a list of great demands O’Billy McGee McGaw
So the made a list of great demands and handed out many commands
And said do them now or get off our lands CAW CAW CAW
We’re the meanest guys you ever saw.
The time is right The land lord say of O’Billy McGee McGaw
The time is right they said with mirth, to get rid of this scum and increase our worth
Let them rot on the street and beg food to eat CAW CAW CAW
We’re above the Law

And they flapped their wings and cried, CAW CAW CAW

WARNING

WARNING1 Judy Morton is concerned that her OSTA email address has been hacked and that messages may go out that appear to be from her asking for money to be wired somewhere, like to a bank. We ask you to realize these will be scam messages and to ignore them. Neither a bank nor MH/OSTA would ever send an email asking you to wire money. Be very suspicious of requests for wiring  money, even if the requests are from your nephew in Nigeria! Judy will probably change her OSTA email address, but we will let you know if she does, probably in the next OSTA Quarterly Review if not sooner.

Long-term Rental Agreements Cause Concern

The MH/OSTA district directors and the attorneys on our board have been receiving calls from concerned manufactured home park residents recently because some landlords are promoting long-term rental agreements. Our advise is NOT to sign these leases/rental agreements. We also encourage you to document any promises about these noting date, time, place, who made the promise and to whom. Also document any threats made if you don't sign and any promises made if you will sign. Keep in mind that a 30-day (month-to-month) rental agreement doesn't ever expire. OSTA is investigating these long-term rental contracts, and we expect to be able to answer your questions at the annual meeting on Oct. 1.

Oregon State Rep. Val Hoyle to speak at meeting on Saturday, Oct. 1, in Cottage Grove

The latest update on the 2016 annual MH/OSTA state meeting at Village Green is the good news that Rep. Val Hoyle, Oregon State House Majority Leader, during the 2015 session, will be speaking to us in the afternoon. This photo was taken last year at SongBrook MHP  after a chapter meeting. With her are Ken Capron and Mike Berg. Representative Hoyle has been a hard-working supporter of manufactured/mobile home residents and is both a knowledgeable and entertaining speaker. We're delighted she will be joining us.

Because concerns have been brought to our attention recently, we also plan to have information on various types of rental agreements. And of course there's always good food and a little bit of fun.

The morning session will be on mediation with Marlena Bertram from the Yamhill County  Dispute Resolution Center and our OSTA Quarterly Review columnist and also Chip Coker from the Lane County Center. If you'd like to ask a question of them, please email it with your reservation.

Seven current directors will be up for election at this meeting. Any member is welcome to run for a spot on the state board, but applications should be submitted ahead of time. Contact your district director for application forms or send a resume to P.O. 24958, Eugene, OR 97402.

 Reservations are being accepted through September 23. Those who want to spend either Friday or Saturday night at the Inn, need to reserve a room by August 31. Tell the desk you're with the Manufactured Housing convention.